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PROGRAM NOTES

All listings here are in the public domain. You are free to use them as you see fit. If you use any of these notes bodily, it would be nice for you to acknowledge the author (if the author is given).

The Listing Directory (just below) is (mostly) alphabetical by the first significant word of the title. The Listings themselves are in pretty much random order. But the directory or the search facility (see the next paragraph) should enable you to find what you want pretty quickly.

To find a particular tune or author or arranger, use your browser's "FIND" feature. (On MSIE, this is on the "Edit" menu, also reached by using Ctrl-F.) Then type in even a portion of what you're looking for and click the "OK" or "Find Next" button.

NARRATOR vs. PRINT Suitability: Generally any notes intended for narrator can be made suitable for printing in programs by merely deleting (or modifying) the last sentence or so. And notes intended for print can be made suitable for a narrator by adding something along the line of "Ladies and Gentlemen, we now present..."

For the future: We will someday put these notes into a database, so they'll be easier to find. That will happen after some music sales from the main site allow us to afford that. In the meantime, the listing below should be quite useful.

LISTING DIRECTORY (*) indicates duplicate - title variation

By Title

A B C D E F G H  I  J K L M

N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

By Author

A B C D E F G H  I  J K L M

N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A Patriot's Anthem
America, My Homeland
America The Beautiful
An American In Paris
American Overture For Band
American Patrol
Americana
Amparito Roca
An Italian In Algiers
Angels From The Realms of Glory
Armed Forces Salute
The Association of Concert Bands March

Barnum and Bailey's Favorite
Big Band Cavalcade
Big Band Spectacular
Bricusse and Newley on Broadway 
Broadway Showstoppers
Brighton Beach
The Billboard March
Bugler's Holiday

Camp Town Bash
Carmen
Carol of the Bells/Greensleeves
Carol of the Drum
Chester
A Christmas Festival (Anderson)
Christmas Festival (Lamater)
Christmas Party
Christmas Scenes Overture
Christmas Spirit
Clarinet Candy
Coat Of Arms

To Dance in the Secret Garden
Deep River
Do You Hear What I Hear?
The Downeaster March

El Capitan
Elsa's Procession to the Cathedral
English Folk Song Suite (Mmt 1)
Entry of the Gladiators
España Cañi

A Fireside Christmas

Gershwin!
God Of Our Fathers
Great Songs of Christmas

Hallelujah Chorus
Hark The Herald Angels Sing
His Eye Is On The Sparrow
Hosts of Freedom 

Italian In Algiers (*)

The Klaxon March 

Lassus Trombone
Latin and Lace
Liberty Bell March

The Magic of Andrew Lloyd Webber
March and Procession of Bacchus
Marche Slav
Morning, Noon, and Night in Vienna

My Fair Lady

National Emblem
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine

O Holy Night
An Old-Fashioned Christmas
Olympic Fanfare and Theme
On The Mall
Orpheus In The Underworld
Overture For Winds

Parade of the Doodlebugs 
Parade of Tall Ships
People Who Live In Glass Houses
Phantom of the Opera

Poet And Peasant Overture
Polar Express (Themes from)

Rhapsody In Blue
Rolling Thunder

Semper Fidelis
Seventy-Six Trombones
Skater's Holiday

Silvercrest March
Sinatra In Concert 
Sleigh Ride
The Sound Of Music
Star Wars Medley
Strategic Air Command March
Stars And Stripes Forever
Themes from SUPERMAN
Swingle Bells

Thunder and Blazes
Trombonium 
Touching Basses


Washington Post March
Water Music Suite
White Christmas  
William Tell Overture
Winter Wonderland
Wonderful World of Christmas

Zampa Overture

 

Anderson, Leroy

A Christmas Festival

Clarinet Candy

Bugler's Holiday

Seventy-Six Trombones (arr., by Willson)

Sleigh Ride

 

Bagley, E.E.

National Emblem

Barker, Warren

Big Band Spectacular (arr)

Bricusse & Newley on Broadway (arr)

Broadway Showstoppers (arr)

GERSHWIN! (arr)

The Magic of Andrew Lloyd Webber (arr)

Phantom Of The Opera (arr~, by Webber)

Bennett, David

Winter Wonderland (arr. by Smith & Bernard)

Bourgeois, John

People Who Live In Glass Houses (by Sousa)

Butts, Carol M.

Skater's Holiday

Buchtel, Forest L.

Christmas Scenes Overture

 

Cailliet, Lucien

Elsa's Procession To The Cathedral (arr., by Wagner)

An Italian In Algiers (arr., by Rossini)

Carter, Charles

Overture for Winds

Chattaway, Jay

Parade of the Tall Ships

Christensen, Jim

The Sound Of Music (selections, arr~, by Rogers & Hammerstein)

The Wonderful World of Christmas

Clark, Andy

Big Band Cavalcade

Clark, Larry

Carol Of The Bells/Greensleeves

Custer, Calvin

Do You Hear What I Hear? (arr., by Regney & Shayne)

Curnow, Jim

Olympic Fanfare and Theme (arr., by Williams)

Christmas Party

 

Delibes, Leo

March & Procession Of Bacchus

De Lamater, Ed

A Christmas Festival

Dragon, Carmen

America The Beautiful (arr.~, by Ward)

 

Edmunds, John

Latin And Lace

Erickson, Frank

Americana

 

Fall, E

Marche Slav (Tschaikowsky)

Fillmore, Henry

The Klaxon

Lassus Trombone

Morning, Noon, & Night in Vienna (by Von Suppe)

Rolling Thunder

Foster, Stephen Collin

Camp Town Bash (arr. Miller)

Fucik, Julius

Entry of The Gladiators (Thunder and Blazes)

 

Gabriel, Charles H.

His Eye Is On The Sparrow (arr. Hamilton)

Gershwin, George

An American In Paris

Rhapsody in Blue

Goldman, Edwin Franko

On The Mall

 

Handel, George Frederic

Hallelujah Chorus (arr. Longfield)

Water Music Suite

 

Jenkins, Joseph Wilcox

American Overture For Band

Jones, Michael C.

Semper Fidelis (ed., by Sousa)

 

Kenny, George

Coat of Arms

King, Karl L.

Barnum & Bailey's Favorite

Hosts of Freedom

Klohr, John

The Billboard March

 

Latham, William

Brighton Beach

Leidzen, Erik

White Christmas (arr., by Irving Berlin)

William Tell Overture (arr., by Rossini)

Lerner and Lowe

My Fair Lady

Longfield, Robert

España Cani (arr., by Marquiña)

Hallelujah Chorus (arr., by Handel)

Lowden, Bob

Armed Forces Salute (arr)

Great Songs of Christmas

Themes from Superman (arr., by Williams)

 

Meacham, Frank W.

American Patrol (arr. Yoder)

Mendelssohn, Felix

Hark The Herald Angels Sing (arr. Ployhar)

Miller, David P.

A Patriot's Anthem (Star Spangled Banner)

The Association of Concert Bands March

Camp Town Bash

Downeaster March

El Capitan (ed., by Sousa)

Liberty Bell March (arr., by Sousa)

O Holy Night (by Adan)

Swingle Bells

Touching Basses

Washington Post (ed., by Sousa)

Moreland, Fred L.

Parade of the Doodlebugs

 

Nestico, Sammy

Christmas Spirit

A Fireside Christmas

Nowak, Jerry

Sinatra In Concert

 

Offenbach, Jacques

Orpheus In The Underworld

Olivadoti, J.

An Old-Fashioned Christmas

 

Ployhar, James

Hark the Herald Angels Sing (arr., by Mendelssohn)

 

Rogers and Hammerstein

The Sound Of Music (selections, arr J. Christiansen)

Rossini, Gioacchino

An Italian In Algiers (arr., Cailliet)

William Tell Overture (arr. Leidzen)

 

Safranek, V.F.

Zampa Overture (arr., by Herold)

Schumann, William

Chester (by William Billings)

Smith, Claude T.

God Of Our Fathers

Smith, Robert W.

Angels From The Realms of Glory (by Smart)

To Dance In The Secret Garden

Sousa, John Philip

El Capitan (Ed. Miller)

Nobles of the Mystic Shrine

Liberty Bell March (arr., Miller)

People Who Live In Glass Houses (arr. Bourgeois)

Semper Fidelis (ed. Jones)

Stars & Stripes Forever

Washington Post (ed. Miller)

Story, Michael

Themes from The Polar Express (arr.)

Swearingen, James

Deep River (arr)

Silvercrest March

 

Tatgenhorst, John

Star Wars Medley (arr~, by John Williams)

Texidor, Jaime

Amparito Roca

Tschaikowsky, Peter Ilyich

Marche Slav (arr. E. Fall)

 

Verdi, Giuseppe

Carmen

Von Suppe, Franz

Morning, Noon, & Night In Vienna (arr. Fillmore)

Poet And Peasant Overture

 

Ward, Samuel Augustus

America The Beautiful (arr. Dragon)

Webber, Andrew Lloyd

Phantom of the Opera (arr. Barker)

Wehrle, Floyd

Carol of the Drum (arr. by Katherine Davis)

Wendel, Paul

America, My Homeland

Williams, Clifton (James Clifton)

Strategic Air Command March

Williams, John

Olympic Fanfare & Theme (arr. Curnow)

Star Wars Medley (arr Tatgenhorst)

Themes from Superman (arr. Lowden)

Williams, Ralph Vaughn

Seventeen Come Sunday (from English Folk Song Suite)

Willson, Meredith

Seventy-Six Trombones (arr. Anderson)

Withrow, Buell N.

Trombonium (arr., Danmark)

 

Yoder, Paul

American Patrol (arr., by Meacham)

 

 


PROGRAM NOTES LISTING

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
The Billboard March (1901) John N. Klohr Narrator
Notes: John Klohr wrote more than 20 marches, including The Billboard March, which he wrote in 1901, and dedicated to The Billboard, a newspaper for general amusement first published that same year. The melody of the trio of this march became so popular that even today most people recognize it. Ladies and Gentlemen, The Billboard March.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Star Wars Medley John Williams / John Tatgenhorst Narrator
Notes: John Williams' 1977 score for George Lucas' "Star Wars" reinforces the high adventure and soaring spirits of the film's story. For this medley, arranger Tatgenhorst has chosen the Title Theme and Princess Leia's theme, keeping all of the excitement and exuberance of the original score. Ladies and Gentlemen, sit back and enjoy a medley of the themes from Star Wars. 

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
The Strategic Air Command March Clifton Williams Narrator
Notes: Clifton Williams was born in Arkansas in 1923. He joined the Army Air Corps as a bandsman in 1942, and after the war, attended Louisiana State University. He earned his Master of Music degree at the Eastman School of Music, then taught at the University of Texas at Austin for seventeen years. The ten years before his death in 1976, he taught composition at the University of Miami in Florida. Clifton Williams is widely acknowledged as the one person who took the band out of the park and put it onto the concert stage. In 1963, Williams wrote the Strategic Air Command concert march, and it was premiered at the New York World’s Fair in 1964 by the Heartland Of America Band from Offutt AFB, Nebraska, headquarters of the Strategic Air Command. Ladies and Gentlemen, the Strategic Air Command Concert March.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Marche Slav  (March Slave) Peter Ilych Tschaikowsky / E. Fall Narrator
Notes: Pyotr Il'yich Tschaikowsky died in 1890 at the age of 53, perhaps the greatest romantic composer who ever lived. He wrote Marche Slav in 1877, combining themes from Slavonic and Serbian folk songs and the Russian national anthem. It was premiered at a concert given for the benefit of soldiers wounded in the war between Turkey and Serbia, which later was known as the Russo-Turkish war. This piece contains all of the fire and excitement of Tschaikowsky's tempestuous personality. Ladies and Gentlemen, Tschaikowsky's Marche Slav. 

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

5

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
(Selections from) The Sound Of Music Richard Rogers / Jim Christensen Narrator
Notes: Richard Rodgers published his first song at age 15. Following the death of his first collaborator, Lorenz Hart, Rodgers teamed with Oscar Hammerstein to produce nine Broadway shows, including Oklahoma, Carousel, South Pacific, Pal Joey, The King and I, Flower Drum Song, State Fair and the show whose medley you are about to hear, The Sound of Music. In this medley, arranged by Jim Christensen, you will hear the title theme, Do-Re-Mi, A Few Of My Favorite Things, and Climb Every Mountain. Ladies and Gentlemen, the ******** band now plays for you a medley of songs from The Sound of Music.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
The Stars and Stripes Forever John Philip Sousa Narrator
Notes: On December 11, 1987, President Ronald Reagan signed into law federal bill S. 860. The text of this law reads: "Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representative of the United States of America in Congress assembled, that the composition by John Philip Sousa entitled 'The Stars and Stripes Forever' is hereby designated as the national march of The United States of America."

And so this march, which Sousa believed to be divinely inspired, officially took its place in our national heritage. 

In his 78 years, Sousa composed 136 marches, 15 operettas, 70 songs, 11 waltzes, and many other works. 

In the fall of 1896, when Sousa was vacationing in Europe, he learned of the death of his good friend and business manager David Blakely. He cancelled the rest of his vacation and sailed immediately for New York. On this voyage, he conceived The Stars and Stripes Forever. 

Here is the incident in Sousa's own words: "…I was absorbed in thoughts of my managers death … Suddenly I began to sense the rhythmic beat of a band playing within my brain. It kept on ceaselessly, playing, playing, playing. Throughout the whole tense voyage, that imaginary band continued to unfold the same themes, echoing and re-echoing the most distinct melody. I did not transfer a note of that music to paper while I was on the steamer, but when we reached shore, I set down the measures that my brain-band had been playing for me, and not a note of it has ever changed." 

Ladies and Gentlemen, I give you John Philip Sousa's The Stars and Stripes Forever!

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Camp Town Bash (based on Camp Town Races) / Silver Clef Music Publishing Stephen Collins Foster / David P. Miller Narrator
Notes: Who among us hasn't had the refrain from Stephen C. Foster's Camp Town Races running around in our heads? "Doo-dah! Doo-dah!" As our next piece , the ******** Band presents a marvelous arrangement of this tune, called Camp Town Bash. This arrangement is even more fun than the original tune, but be ready for some surprises!

-- Notes and arrangement by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
America, My Homeland Paul Wendel Narrator
Notes: We’d like to open our concert tonight with Paul Wendel’s award-winning song, America, My Homeland.

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
A Patriot's Anthem (Star Spangled Banner) David P. Miller Narrator
Notes: It’s all too often during the playing of our homeland’s anthem, we see citizens failing to understand or appreciate the significance of the song’s words. Many people have never heard the words to the other verses. Listen now as the band plays a new and special arrangement of this most special of all patriotic songs.  

-- Notes and arrangement by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

  Ladies and Gentlemen, please remain seated for the first verse, and listen carefully to the words Francis Scott Key wrote nearly two hundred years ago. Reflect, if you will, on how amazingly well they reflect our situation in the world today.

-- Notes and arrangement by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

10

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Downeaster March /  Silver Clef Music Publishing David P. Miller Narrator
Notes: Our next tune is the Downeaster March. This march was written more than 20 years before its first performance, when the composer lived in Maine , which is why it’s called Downeaster. This march sat in a filing cabinet for decades, and was finally resurrected in 2004 for the Mississippi Community Symphonic Band. The first public performance of this on September 11, 2004 at the Healing Field in Brandon, Mississippi, where there were 5,000 U.S. flags on display in a 10-acre field to commemorate the fallen and current heroes in the war on terrorism. Enjoy now this performance of the Downeaster March.

-- Notes and arrangement by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
March and Procession of Bacchus Leo Delibes Any
Notes: Leo Delibes (DEL-i-bay) wrote the ballet Sylvia in 1876. Despite the pagan nature of the story behind the ballet, the music is delightful and memorable. You’ll recognize the brass fanfares and inspiring melodies in Delibes’ March and Procession of Bacchus.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Entry of the Gladiators (Thunder and Blazes) Julius Fucik Any
Notes: The march The Entry of the Gladiators was written by Julis Fucik (FYOO-sik), a student of Antonin Dvorak. It has also been known by the title Thunder and Blazes.  Over the last few decades it has been used so frequently during circus performances that many people now call it That Circus March. Regardless of what you call it, you’ll recognize this great march, The Entry of the Gladiators!

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Big Band Spectacular (Various) / Warren Barker Narrator
Notes: Okay folks, warm up your ankles! It’s toe-tapping time! Are you in the mood for Glenn Miller’s … In The Mood? Can you say "hello, dolly" to a … Satin Doll? Would it cheer you to hear Ciriciribin? Would you like to jump with … Jumpin’ at the Woodside? Well, get ready to party, because you’re about to hear Warren Barker’s great arrangement of Big Band Spectacular!

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Lassus Trombone Henry Fillmore / Loras Shissel Narrator
Notes: Henry Fillmore wrote more than a dozen marches that featured the trombone section. He became interested in the trombone in spite of his father’s conviction that the trombone was “too evil for any righteous person to play!” His most famous trombone feature, Lassus Trombone, was John Philip Sousa’s favorite march. According to arranger Loras Schissel, the “Lassus” in Lassus Trombone stands for molasses. The ******** Band now features their trombone section in Lassus Trombone!

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

15

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Americana (Traditional) / Frank Erickson Narrator
Notes: In this time of renewed patriotism, it is also a time to reflect on the history, development, and traditions of our country. Frank Erickson has put together a wonderful musical remembrance, including the tunes Chester , Georgia Camp Town Meeting, The Yellow Rose of Texas , and The Battle Hymn of the Republic. Listen now as the ******** Band brings you the medley Americana.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
The Phantom of the Opera Andrew Lloyd Webber / Warren Barker Narrator
Notes: Andrew Lloyd Webber is arguably the most famous of all modern day composers of Broadway-style musical shows. Born in Britain , he was knighted in 1992 and made a “life peer” in 1997. He has written musicals from the time he was a teenager, starting with Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat in 1968, and continuing with such smash hits as Jesus Christ-Superstar, Evita, the historically long-running Cats, and the Tony-award-winning musical you are about to hear, The Phantom of the Opera.

Ladies and Gentlemen, we play for you now Warren Barker's stirring arrangement of Andrew Lloyd Webber's The Phantom Of The Opera.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Coat of Arms March George Kenny Print
Notes: One of the most characteristic types of music for bands, one of the things that most distinguishes it from other types of musical organizations, is the march. There are many great marches that form the standard for band literature, but few are more widely recognized than George Kenny’s famous 1957 march, Coat of Arms.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
My Fair Lady Alan Lerner and Frederick Lowe / (?) Narrator
Notes: Alan Lerner and Frederick Lowe’s musical My Fair Lady played for over 2,700 performances on Broadway, and over 2,200 performances in London . As the band plays music from this show, you may recognize the songs With A Little Bit of Luck, On the Street Where You Live, Wouldn’t It Be Loverly?, Get Me To The Church On Time, I’ve Grown Accustomed To Her Face, On The Street Where You Live, and I Could Have Danced All Night.  The ******** Band now plays for you the music from My Fair Lady.  
-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
America The Beautiful Samuel Augustus Ward / Carmen Dragon Narrator
Notes:

As their final selection of the evening, the ******** Band pays tribute to all patriots:

To those who serve in the military, past, present and future;  

To those first responders who risk their lives to serve you, our citizens –the police, the firefighters, and the paramedics;

and To all of you who love your country;

We salute you all with Carmen Dragon’s heart-stirring arrangement of America The Beautiful.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

20

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Barnum and Bailey's Favorite Karl L. King Narrator
Notes:

The composer of our next piece, Karl L. King, realized the dreams of many boys of his day – at age eighteen he ran off to join the circus! He loved music even as a child, buying a used cornet with money he made from selling newspapers. He played in and directed a number of circus bands, including two years as director of the famous Barnum and Bailey circus band. He also played in and directed many community bands, serving for 51 years as the director of the Fort Dodge, Iowa, Community Band, leading them to their reputation as one of the nation’s best bands. During his life, Karl King composed over 300 pieces of music, including serenades, overtures, solos, rags, and 188 marches. 

King wrote the march Barnum and Bailey’s Favorite in 1913 for that circus’s band, and it has all the excitement and contrast found in the music for the big top. It consistently ranks as one of the most popular marches ever written. Ladies and Gentlemen, I give you Karl King’s march, Barnum and Bailey’s Favorite!  

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Overture For Winds Charles Carter Narrator
Notes: Charles Carter has written hundreds of compositions and arrangements for school and community bands. He began writing music in high school, and studied music at Ohio State University and the Eastman School of Music. After World War II, he taught music classes at Ohio State and at Florida State University . His Overture for Winds has remained his most popular work since its original publication. The ******** Band now plays for you Charles Carter’s Overture for Winds.
 
-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Bugler's Holiday Leroy Anderson Narrator
Notes: Leroy Anderson is one of the most beloved of American composers. His music has delighted audiences for almost a century with such tunes as The Typewriter Song, The Penny Whistle Song, A Trumpeter's Lullaby, and Sleigh Ride. 

Bugler's Holiday, the tune you are about to hear, has very likely inspired more student trumpet players to hours of practice than any other piece. As we play this tune, listen of course to the inspiring melody, the terrific harmonies, and the great accompaniment Anderson wrote. But most of all, listen to the rhythms in the trio. To play notes this fast, trumpet players need to use a technique called "double tonguing," and it's something that takes a lot of practice. Getting all three trumpets to play these fast notes together is even more of a challenge.

The ******** Band now features trumpet players (Player 1), (Player 2), and (Player 3) in Leroy Anderson's famous - Bugler's Holiday.

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Hosts of Freedom March Karl L. King Narrator
Notes: Another Karl L. King Circus March is his regal Hosts of Freedom march. This march, while not written specifically for the big top, has nevertheless been used as a fast finale by many circus bands, including the Clyde Beatty-Cole Brothers Circus, the King Brothers Circus, the Royal Hanneford Circus, and many others.  Listen now as the ******** band brings you Karl L. King’s Hosts of Freedom march.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Bricusse and Newley On Broadway Bricusse and Newley / Warren Barker Narrator
Notes: Warren Barker is famous in the music world. He has been composer, arranger, and conductor for 20th Century Fox, for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, and for Columbia motion picture studios, as well as having written the music for more than thirty television series, including Bewitched, The Flying Nun, and That Girl. More recently, Barker is also famous for his wonderful medleys of familiar tunes arranged for band.  In Bricusse (pronounced Brickus) and Newley on Broadway, Barker has brought us such delightful songs as On a Wonderful Day Like Today, Who Can I Turn To, Gonna Build A Mountain, and What Kind of Fool Am I? Ladies and gentlemen, we play for you now Warren Barker’s arrangement of Bricusse and Newley On Broadway.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

25
Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Olympic Fanfare And Theme John Williams / Jim Curnow Narrator
Notes: Composer John Williams has written some of the best movie music this world has ever known, including music most of Stephen Spielberg’s epic adventures. But for the Olympic Games in Los Angeles in 1984, Williams opened a new genre of music. The brilliant fanfare theme, the huge sounds, the lush textures, all of it left a worldwide audience breathless when John Williams premiered it with the Los Angeles Symphony at the Olympic Games’ opening ceremonies. Jim Curnow has created a marvelous transcription of this work for band, and we’d like to play it for you know. Ladies and Gentlemen, John Williams’ Olympic Fanfare and Theme.

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
English Folk Song Suite: Seventeen Come Sunday (First movement only) Ralph Vaughn Williams Narrator
Notes: Ralph (pronounced “Rafe”- at his own insistence) Vaughn Williams is one of the two people, with Gustav Holst, who, in the first part of the twentieth century, established English music as distinct from that of Germany and Italy . In his music, you can hear the air of the countryman that was his personality. He also helped establish the wind band as a serious concert group. In Seventeen Come Sunday, the first movement of his famed English Folk Song Suite, you will hear echoes of the folk songs of Norfolk and Somerset , complete with their dark, modal harmonies, and the lilting dance rhythms of the people. Here, Ladies and Gentlemen, is the first movement of Ralph Vaughn Williams’ English Folk Song Suite, Seventeen Come Sunday.

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
American Patrol Frank W. Meacham / Paul Yoder Narrator
Notes: Frank W. Meacham was born in 1856, and wrote hundreds of tunes. His best known composition is American Patrol, which was written about 1885 and first published for band in 1912. Since then, the tune has been played and recorded by dozens of bands, orchestras, and choirs, including those of John Philip Sousa and Glenn Miller. This arrangement includes the melodies of other tunes as well. Listen for the tunes Columbia , the Gem of The Ocean and Yankee Doodle, as the Mississippi Community Symphonic Band plays for you now Paul Yoder’s arrangement of American Patrol.

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Skater's Holiday Carol M. Butts Narrator
Notes:
(Please modify this as needed if you don't live or play in the South.) 
The holiday season is fast upon us.  The decorations are going up, the stores are laying in stocks of ribbons and wrapping paper, and the children are trying to be extra good. And even though we live in the South, the weather is going to get colder.   Really, it will!  To help us set the mood for the holiday season, the ******** Band will play for you now a delightful little number that just sounds like Christmas. Enjoy with us now Carroll M. Butts’ composition,  Skater’s Holiday.

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Hark The Herald Angels Sing Felix Mendelssohn / James Ployhar Narrator
Notes: Felix Mendelssohn wrote a huge quantity of music during his life, including one of our all-time favorite Christmas Carols. Listen now to James Ployhar's arrangement of Mendelssohn's Hark! The Herald Angels Sing.

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

30
Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Christmas Spirit (Traditional) / Sammy Nestico Narrator
Notes: Sammy Nestico, a famous composer and the official arranger for the Air Force band for a number of years, has included the themes from Silent Night, the Westminster Carol, Away In A Manger, and Joy to the World in this delightful medley. The ******** Band now plays Sammy Nestico's arrangement of Christmas Spirit

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Great Songs of Christmas (Traditional) / Robert Lowden Narrator
Notes: What Christmas celebration would be complete without hearing Winter Wonderland, delighting in Silver Bells, or envisioning the images evoked by the Christmas Song (Chestnuts roasting on an open fire)? Enjoy these tunes now as we play Robert Lowden's arrangement of the Great Songs of Christmas.

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Christmas Scenes Overture (Traditional) / Forrest L. Buchtel Narrator
Notes: In this next medley of Christmas songs, we begin in the middle east and England with themes from Bring A Torch, Jeanette Isabella, Coventry Carol, and Away In A Manger, then we travel all the way to the North Pole to hear Parade of the Tin Soldiers and March of the Toys straight from Santa's workshop. Enjoy with us now Forrest Buchtel's Christmas Scenes Overture.

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Christmas Party (Traditional) / James Curnow Narrator
Notes: The Christmas Season includes the traditions of decorating our homes, schools, even our cities. Look around you even now at these marvelous lights and decorarions. The Christmas tune Deck The Halls celebrates this tradition of decorating for the season. James Curnow has written a delightful and festive set of variations on Deck The Halls. The ******** Band now presents James Curnow’s Christmas Party.

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Carol of the Drum Katherine K. Davis / Floyd E. Wehrle Narrator
Notes: The "Carol Of The Drum" tells the story of a child who had no gift to bring to the Christ child, so instead played his drum. The gift of music is one of the most heartfelt gifts we can bestow during this season. Listen now as the ******** Band brings you this gift: Floyd Wehrle's arrangement of Katherine Davis' famous Carol of the Drum.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

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Winter Wonderland Dick Smith and Felix Bernard / David Bennett Narrator
Notes: Snow is not a usual occurrence here in the South. Even so, with all the decorations, the music, and the festive spirit that permeates our community, we are truly walking in a winter wonderland. Enjoy with us now David Bennett's arrangement of Dick Smith and Felix Bernard's Christmas classic, "Winter Wonderland."

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
White Christmas Irving Berlin / Erik Leidzen Narrator
Notes: Irving Berlin's "White Christmas" was the first secular holiday tune to achieve overwhelming popularity. Bing Crosby's record of it has become the biggest selling record of all time, with current estimates topping 350 million copies. For decades, this song has struck a wistful note among generations of people yearning for Christmas joy. Ladies and Gentlemen, Irving Berlin's White Christmas.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
An Old-Fashioned Christmas (Traditional) / J. Olivadoti Narrator
Notes: A medley is a series of different tunes, joined together in a potpourri that make up a single arrangement. J. Olivadoti has included the tunes from Joy To The World, It Came Upon A Midnight Clear, Sleep, Holy Babe, Christ Was Born On Christmas Day, Silent Night, and Jingle Bells in this wonderful medley he calls "An Old-Fashioned Christmas."

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Swingle Bells (Jingle Bells) / Silver Clef Music (Traditional) / David P. Miller Narrator
Notes: You have already heard Jingle Bells a few times tonight, both here and earlier. It's a great tune that conveys a great deal of the joy and festiveness of the season. But did you ever feel like dancing to Jingle Bells? Me either. But you might feel like it when you hear this arrangement. Ladies and gentlemen, we will now play for you Jingle Bells like you've never heard it before: David Miller's arrangement, Swingle Bells.

-- Notes and Arrangement by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Alternate Notes: One of the all time favorites of the Christmas season is Jingle Bells. But how many ways can you play it?

Well, we’ve got a new one. This arrangement, called Swingle Bells, is somewhat jazzy, somewhat funky, and loads of fun.

I know it will be tempting, but please refrain from dancing in the aisles as we play this tune. Namely, because we really don’t have any aisles.

Ladies and Gentlemen, enjoy with us now David Millers’ funky arrangement, Swingle Bells.

-- Notes and Arrangement by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Sleigh Ride Leroy Anderson Narrator
Notes: Since 1948, when it became an instant smash hit, one of the all-time favorite Christmas songs has been Leroy Anderson's Sleigh Ride. The ******** Band is pleased to play it for you now. Ladies and Gentlemen, Leroy Anderson's famous Sleigh Ride!

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

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A Christmas Festival (Traditional) / Leroy Anderson Narrator
Notes: Leroy Anderson has given us a great many delightful compositions and arrangements, such as Sleigh Ride, Bugler's Holiday. The Syncopated Clock, The Typewriter Song, and The Penny Whistle Song. Another of his favorites is this delightful arrangement of the Christmas favorites, Joy To The World, Deck The Halls, God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen, Good King Wenceslas, Hark! The Herald Angels Sing, Silent Night, and Adeste Fideles. Ladies and Gentlemen, the ******** Band closes its concert this evening with Leroy Anderson's A Christmas Festival.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Christmas Festival (Traditional) / Ed De Lamater Narrator
Notes: For our final tune, we would like to play for you the tunes Jolly Old St. Nicholas, Oh, Christmas Tree, O Come, All Ye Faithful, and Jingle Bells, in Ed De Lamater's medley, Christmas Festival.

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Washington Post March / Silver Clef Music John Philip Sousa / David P. Miller Narrator
Notes: In 1889, Sousa wrote The Washington Post march to promote an essay contest sponsored by the Washington Post newspaper. The march was soon identified with a new dance called the two-step. Before long, The Washington Post March became the most popular tune in America and Europe . Critics everywhere raved over it. A British journalist made the comment that since Johann Strauss, Jr. was called the "Waltz King," then the American bandmaster Sousa should be called the "March King." With this remark, Sousa’s title was endowed and has remained ever since.  Ladies and Gentlemen, John Philip Sousa’s Washington Post March.

-- Notes and arrangement by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
American Overture for Band Joseph Willcox Jenkins Narrator
Notes: Written originally for the U.S. Army Field Band as a musical portrayal of the spirit of the American Frontier, Joseph Willcox Jenkins' 1955 work American Overture For Band has become one of the staples of superb band literature. Some of the most obvious features of this composition are the distinctive horn section solos, beloved and anguished over by horn players worldwide. 

Enjoy now the musical portrayal of the spirit of the American frontier in Joseph Willcox Jenkins' American Overture For Band.

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Latin and Lace John F. Edmunds Narrator
Notes: John F. Edmunds has written a great deal of band music, much of it for the University of Texas and for Louisiana State University, where he taught for almost thirty years all together. 

Before he was a college professor, he was a band director for Colonial High School in Orlando, Florida. While Edmunds was teaching in Orlando, he wrote several tunes, including Latin And Lace, which the band will play for you now. Ladies and Gentlemen, we give you John Edmunds fun tune, Latin And Lace.

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

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Elsa's Procession To The Cathedral Richard Wagner / Lucien Cailliet Narrator
Notes: One of the most well-known musical compositions in the world is the famous wedding march, the one to which schoolchildren everywhere sing "Here comes the Bride." This wedding march was written by Richard Wagner in his opera "Lohengrin." During the opera, the lady getting married is Elsa. Strangely enough, she's marrying a knight who rides a swan, and she doesn't even know her beau's name. We would like to play for you now the tune Wagner wrote to depict the regal procession leading up to her marriage. The tune begins with a lovely pastoral theme and develops through the entire procession, to climax with Elsa's dynamic arrival at the cathedral. Ladies and Gentlemen, we play for you now Lucien Cailliet's transcription of Richard Wagner's Elsa's Procession To The Cathedral.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
To Dance In The Secret Garden Robert W. Smith Narrator
Notes: Robert Smith is a prolific composer, with over 500 works to his name. He is one of the most frequently performed living composers, one reason for which is that his music is always easy to listen to.

To Dance in the Secret Garden was commissioned by the North Jersey Music Educator's Association. It gets its name from the fact that New Jersey is the Garden State. The work is set in a large three-part structure. It opens with a stirring fanfare theme, and moves on to a slower middle section, which features a wonderful horn/alto sax melody. Finally, a return to the opening theme and its energetic tempo closes the work. 

We now present the ******** Band, under the direction of ******, playing To Dance in the Secret Garden.

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
The Association Of Concert Bands March / Silver Clef Music Publishing David P. Miller Narrator
Notes: The Association of Concert Bands was formed in 1977 to encourage and foster adult bands in America, and to promote performances of great music such as that you're hearing tonight. When composer David Miller went to the ACB National Convention in April 2004, he was so impressed he determined to write a musical tribute to the ACB and all they've done to promote community music in America. Ladies and Gentlemen, I present to you this tribute, The Association of Concert Bands March.

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Themes from SUPERMAN John Williams / Robert Lowden Narrator
Notes: In 1978, Composer John Williams finished writing music for the movie Superman. It is interesting to note that Robert Redford, Clint Eastwood, and James Caan were all offered the title role for the film. They all turned it down, citing reasons from "I'm too busy" to "I'm not getting into that silly suit!" 

Christopher Reeve accepted the role and became the new Superman, while John Williams cemented his title as the "Superman of Movie Music Writers." 

In this compilation of tunes from the movie, you will hear the Main Theme, The Planet Krypton, The March of the Villains, and the haunting love song, Can You Read My Mind? Ladies and Gentlemen, the ******* Band presents for you now Robert Lowden's arrangement of Themes from the Movie Superman.

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Nobles Of The Mystic Shrine John Philip Sousa Narrator
Notes: The Nobles Of The Mystic Shrine is unique among Sousa marches in that it begins in a minor key, and includes a part for harp, which we unfortunately do not have with us tonight. 

Are there any harp players in the audience who might like to sit in with us on this tune? Did you bring your instrument with you? 

In this tune, Sousa, who was a Shriner, intended to recreate the musical styles of the Shriners' "Turkish Music," including a heavy bass drum part and the sudden fortissimo outbursts in the first section. Listen now as the ******** Band plays for you John Philip Sousa's stirring march, Nobles Of The Mystic Shrine.

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

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The Magic of Andrew Lloyd Webber Andrew Lloyd Webber / Warren Barker Narrator
Notes: Andrew Lloyd Webber is without a doubt the most celebrated and prolific contemporary composer of music for Broadway-style musical shows. 

Famous music writer Warren Barker has brought together into this arrangement five of Webber's most famous signature themes, including Jesus Christ, Superstar, I Don't Know How To Love Him, Don't Cry For Me, Argentina, the haunting Memory, and the spine-tingling Phantom Of The Opera. Ladies and Gentlemen, we play for you now The Magic Of Andrew Lloyd Webber.

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
National Emblem E. E. (Edwin Eugene) Bagley Narrator
Notes: Edwin Eugene Bagley (1857-1922) was a somewhat obscure New England composer of patriotic tunes; much of his work remains unheralded even today. However, famed composer Frederick Fennell has said of Bagley’s famous march National Emblem that “It is as perfect as a march can be.” This march has often been mistakenly attributed to Sousa, in that it has all the hallmarks of a top Sousa hit. Written in 1906, National Emblem remains second perhaps only to Sousa’s Stars & Stripes Forever as America ’s favorite patriotic march. Ladies and Gentlemen, E.E. Bagley’s delightful National Emblem march!

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Zampa Overture L.J.F. Herold / V. F. Safranek Narrator
Notes:

Louis J. F. Herold lived in France during his life, 1791 to 1833. Although he lived only 42 years, he composed a long succession of brilliant operas and was well-known during his day. The opera Zampa (1831) was the best of all his operas, and the overture to Zampa is frequently played even today. It is the only work for which this composer remains known today.

This work was originally written for orchestra, and transcribed for band by V.F. Safranek. The original violin parts are very complicated, and Safranek gave these parts to the clarinets. Our clarinet section has worked hard to learn the parts, and has done a great job. This delightful overture is every bit as exciting today as it was the day it was written. Ladies and Gentlemen, Zampa Overture.

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Parade Of The Doodlebugs Fred L. Moreland Narrator
Notes:

Our next tune was written in 1907. It comes from a time when there was no television, no movies, there was even no radio. For entertainment, folks went for walks, or to band concerts, or sat on their front porches in rocking chairs, sipping lemonade and waving to passers-by.

 

This next tune, The Parade Of The Doodlebugs, evokes images of Saturday evenings in the park, with the town band playing a concert in the gazebo, families eating a picnic supper on a blanket in the grass, lightning bugs drifting through the dusk, and laughing boys wheeling wagon hoops through the crowds.

 

Come with us now, ladies and gentlemen, back to the time of carefree lazy evenings, and enjoy Fred L. Moreland’s fun tune, The Parade of the Doodlebugs.  

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Sinatra In Concert arr. Jerry Nowak Narrator
Notes:

Frank Sinatra made an indelible impression on American Music. Ol’ Blue Eyes touched the hearts of millions with his songs. We present four of them tonight, in Jerry Nowak’s arrangement, Sinatra In Concert.

The first song, New York , New York , was written for a film that was a flop. Actor Robert DiNiro didn’t like the first version of the tune, and asked writers John Kander and Fred Ebb to try again. They were incensed, but later admitted DiNiro was right. Liza Minelli kept the song alive in her concerts, but it really took off when Frank Sinatra recorded it in 1980, with slightly different words than the original. 

Other songs in tonight’s medley include It Was A Very Good Year, The Lady Was A Tramp, and the all-time favorite, My Way.

Ladies and Gentlemen, enjoy with us now Sinatra In Concert.

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

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The Klaxon March Henry Fillmore Narrator
Notes:

Autos today come with almost everything as standard equipment. Extra-cost options include such gadgets as a GPS system or a rapture roof. But it wasn’t always so. Some of us can remember when a radio or a heater were optional equipment, or an electric turn signal.

It may surprise you to learn that in the 1920’s, even a car horn was a new, extra-cost option.

For the Cincinnati Auto Show in 1930, famous composer Henry Fillmore wrote a new march The Klaxon that he not only named after the automobile horn, he also premiered it with twelve of the horns playing along with the band!  

Ladies and Gentlemen, Henry Fillmore’s march, The Klaxon.

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Parade of Tall Ships Jay Chattaway Narrator
Notes:

Jay Chattaway served as chief arranger and composer-in-residence for the Navy band in Washington , D.C. for seven years.

On July 4, 1976, as part of our national bicentennial celebration, there was in New York harbor the largest gathering of tall ships ever assembled, Operation Sail. To commemorate this occasion, Chattaway wrote Parade of the Tall Ships, a unique concert march. Chattaway dedicated the march to Commander Ned Muffley and the United States Navy Band, who premiered the piece as part of the Operation Sail activities.  

Join with us now in the majestic imagery of sailing, in Jay Chattaway’s Parade of the Tall Ships.

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Touching Basses David P. Miller Narrator
Notes:

Every musical organization has instruments that mostly play melody, and other instruments that mostly provide support -- the harmonies, the rhythms, and the bass lines.

Tonight, we have for you a march written in honor of those dedicated musicians who provide support down in the musical foundations of all else we play -- those who play the bass lines.

We want you to know we appreciate you --  tubas, baritone saxes, baritone horns, bassoons, bass clarinets. You now get to have the melody for a change! Enjoy! This one’s for you!

Ladies and Gentlemen, David Miller’s march, Touching Basses.

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

NOTES AS MODIFIED BY NARRATOR CHRIS SHELT:

Every musical organization has instruments that play the melody, and other instruments that provide support -- the harmonies, the rhythms, and the bass lines.

Tonight, we have for you a march written in honor of the "lowlifes" in the organization - those who play the bass lines.

We want you to know, you "base" individuals, we appreciate you --  tubas, baritone saxes, baritone horns, bassoons, bass clarinets. You now get to have the melody for a change! Enjoy! This one’s for you!

Ladies and Gentlemen, David Miller’s march, Touching Basses.

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
William Tell Overture Gioacchino Rossini / Erik Leidzen Narrator
Notes: Gioacchino Rossini has been compared to the Michael Jordan of his day – he composed nearly forty major operas by age 37, then retired at the peak of his career. He once remarked to a protégé that the only way to write an overture for an opera was to wait until the night before the opening performance, then lock oneself into a small room until the deed was done. “Nothing inspires more than necessity,” he said.

The opera William Tell was long – around six hours! The overture to the opera, selections from which we will play for you tonight, was organized in the traditional “nature picture” form, opening with a mountain sunrise, and culminating with the fiery call to arms – a hunting scene that in the story has been cast into revolutionary overtones.

Enjoy with us now Erik Leidzen’s arrangement of  Rossini’s The William Tell Overture!

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands
  (arr ?)

Gioacchino Rossini was the Elvis of the 19th Century.  His life was the opposite of everything we might have heard about starving Composers.  He was a Musician from an early age, never practicing any other profession.  His works were celebrated in his lifetime, bringing him fame and fortune.

But, as other composers had been forced to be lawyers or military officers while they dreamed of composing full time, Rossini also had a dream- he wanted to cook!  By age 38 he had composed 38 Operas.  The last thirty or so years of his life were dedicated to being a Chef.  Ever hear of Torneados Rossini?

I could bore you with stories about Swiss Patriots, Austrian oppressors, apples, and arrows, but…..

To any American over 40…..

A Cloud of Dust- and a hearty Hi Yo Silver!!!  The Lone Ranger rides again!

-- Notes by Herb Fischer, Texas

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Brighton Beach  William Latham Narrator
Notes:

William Peters Latham was born in Shreveport , Louisiana , in 1917, and died in Texas in 2004.

He earned a Ph.D. in composition at the Eastman School of Music in 1951, where Howard Hanson was one of his teachers, and went on to teach at the University of Northern Iowa, and at the University of North Texas, where he was designated Professor Emeritus on his retirement.

He composed 118 works, performed in the United States , Canada , Europe, and Japan , by such groups as the Cincinnati Symphony, the Dallas Symphony, the St. Louis Symphony, and Radio Orchestras in Belgium and Holland .

Brighton Beach March, his first published band work, was composed in 1954. It has been listed four times among the 100 most popular marches. The title refers to a famous resort on the southern coast of England .

Ladies and Gentlemen, William Latham’s delightful Brighton Beach march!

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

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GERSHWIN! arr. Warren Barker Narrator
Notes:

George Gershwin, born in Brooklyn in 1898, began his professional career in 1916 in “Tin Pan Alley” as a rehearsal pianist, while studying piano and orchestration.

His first big hit, Swanee, recorded by Al Jolsen, launched a career that saw him compose dozens of hit songs and broadway musicals, and more importantly, establish a unique new type of music blending classical and jazz.

Tonight, we bring you Warren Barker’s arrangement of five of Gershwin’s all-time favorites, including Fascinating Rhythm, Embraceable You, Somebody Loves Me, Someone To Watch Over Me, and I Got Rhythm.  

Ladies and Gentlemen: Gershwin!

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Amparito Roca Jaime Texidor Narrator
Notes: Our next number was composed by Jaime Texidor (HIGH-may TAY-hee-doaduh) and named for a girl who lived in his area. Texidor wrote hundreds of compositions, and he conducted the Baracaldo Municipal band in northern Spain in the 1930’s.

Amparito Roca is an exciting paso doble. A paso doble is a Spanish dance, interpreted literally as a “two-step,” depicting aspects of the popular bullfighting sport. You will easily be able to visualize the traditional Spanish dancers as you hear this fiery tune.

Ladies and gentlemen, enjoy with us now Jaime Texidor’s famous Amparito Roca.

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
An Italian In Algiers Gioacchino Rossini / Lucien Caillet Narrator
Notes:

Gioacchino Rossini wrote more than 35 operas in an amazingly short period of less than two decades.

In his An Italian In Algiers opera, the Dey of Algiers sets about to win the heart of a beautiful Italian girl his captain of Corsairs found on an abandoned ship. Unfortunately, the Dey is married. So he tries to get his wife to marry the Italian girl’s fiancé, but his wife is even more clever. She arranges for the girl and her fiancé to escape, and thus the wife remains in her husband’s affections. A typical Rossini overture, this tune features several soloists and an exciting conclusion.

Ladies and Gentlemen, we play for you now the overture to Rossini’s An Italian in Algiers

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Trombonium Buell N. Withrow / Ribe Danmark Narrator
Notes:

In the years surrounding the dawn of the twentieth century, bands such as those of John Philip Sousa, Harold B. Bachman, Edwin Franko Goldman, and others were in high demand, and frequently played specialty numbers featuring various sections of the band.

One of the best tunes from this era is Buell N. Withrow’s feature tune Trombonium. He named the tune after an unusual upright valve trombone, which, curiously, because it didn’t have a slide, was unable to play the trombone smears that characterize this tune.

Our trombone section has worked hard to learn their special parts in this delightful piece, and they and we all hope you enjoy it as much as we do.  

Ladies and Gentlemen, Buell Withrow’s Trombonium.

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
On The Mall Edwin Franko Goldman Narrator
Notes: “On the Mall” is Edwin Franko Goldman’s most popular march. It was written in 1923 for the dedication of the beautiful new bandstand in New York City ’s Central Park , where the Goldman band had given summer concerts for many years. 

The tune’s name comes from the Park’s “Mall” or promenade, where the bandstand is located. Thousands of New Yorkers would gather “on the mall” to hear the Goldman Band concerts.

Please join in with the band when we reach the well-known part where you can sing or whistle along. The words are: “La-la-la-la-la…” (and so on)

Join with us now, it’s audience participation time, as we all perform Edwin Franko Goldman’s On The Mall.

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

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Deep River arr. James Swearingen Narrator
Notes:

The African-American spiritual Deep River has long been a favorite of most Americans.  Most of us are familiar with the words: Deep River, my home is over Jordan ; Deep River , Lord, I want to cross over into campground. Indeed, many sermons have been built on those very words.

James Swearingen has arranged this beautiful tune for concert band, capturing the majesty and spirit of the hymn.

This setting was commissioned by and dedicated to the Village Presbyterian Church Wind Ensemble, of Prairie Village , Kansas . 

Ladies and Gentlemen, James Swearingen’s setting of Deep River .

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Chester William Billings / William Schuman Narrator
Notes:

William Billings, was born in Boston in 1746. His most famous tune is Chester , which became the most popular song for the colonists during the American revolution, expressing their burning desire for freedom.

William Schuman was President of the Juliard School of Music from 1945 to 1962, and of New York ’s Lincoln Center until he retired in 1969. In 1954, he finished his contemporary setting of Chester as an overture for band.

This work is one that stretches. It has stretched the band to learn to play it, and it will stretch you as listeners. The rich contemporary harmonies do clash at times, but in listening closely, you will always hear the original Chester theme, as Schuman’s genius continually weaves it through the fabric of the overture.

Ladies and Gentlemen, William Schuman’s Overture For Band: Chester .

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Rolling Thunder Henry Fillmore Narrator
Notes: Henry Fillmore is one of America ’s most prolific composers, with more than a thousand compositions and arrangements to his credit, including 113 marches.

One of his favorite styles was the circus march, and he also loved to feature the trombone section in his work. He did both in his 1914 march, Rolling Thunder.

Fillmore described the tempo of this march as “furious,” but circus musicians call marches of this speed “screamers.” Regardless of what you call it, it’s a barn-burning, gut-busting, breakneck march, and we know you’ll have as much fun hearing it as we do playing it.

Enjoy with us now Henry Fillmore’s exciting march, Rolling Thunder!

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Broadway Showstoppers arr. Warren Barker Narrator
Notes: Warren Barker is one of the most prolific and well-liked composers and arrangers of music, particularly music for concert band. In 1947, At age 24, he was appointed chief arranger for The Railroad Hour on NBC, and has since also worked for MGM, 20th Century Fox, Warner Brothers, and Columbia studios. He was the primary composer for many TV shows, including Bewitched and 77 Sunset Strip.

Tonight we bring you Barker's Broadway Showstoppers Overture, including such memorable and delightful tunes as Everything's Coming Up Roses, People, I'm Gettin' Married In The Morning, On A Clear Day, Try To Remember, and That's Entertainment.

Ladies and Gentlemen, Warren Barker's Broadway Showstoppers Overture.

 -- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Semper Fidelis / Silver Clef Music Sousa / Mike Jones Narrator
Notes: John Philip Sousa enlisted in the Marine Corps in 1868 as an apprentice in the Marine Band. He was the conductor of this group from 1880 to 1892, where he built his reputation as a bandmaster of great precision. In 1888, he wrote a march titled after the motto of the Corps, "always faithful," and dedicated it to the officers and men of the Corps.

In Sousa's own words: "I wrote Semper Fidelis one night while in tears, after my comrades of the Marine Corps had sung their famous hymn at Quantico." Musically, Sousa considered this his best march, and it became one of his most popular. According to Sousa, Semper Fidelis is one of the five most effective street marches.

Ladies and Gentlemen, we now give you John Philip Sousa's Semper Fidelis.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

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Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Morning, Noon, and Night in Vienna  Franz Von Suppe / Henry Fillmore Narrator
Notes: Franz Von Suppe - whose full name was Francesco Ezechiele Ermenegildo Cavaliere Suppe-Demelli - wrote Morning, Noon, and Night in Vienna as one of over twenty operetta scores he composed during 1843 and 1845. He became the music director of Pokorny's opera theater in Vienna in 1845, where he served for seventeen years.

In 1922, Henry Fillmore arranged this work for concert band, while he was the director of the Syrian Temple Shrine Band in Cincinnati, Ohio. Under his leadership, the band won every contest they entered.

Ladies and Gentlemen, we present for you now one of the most popular and enduring staples of band literature, Franz Von Suppe's Morning, Noon, and Night in Vienna.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Clarinet Candy Leroy Anderson Narrator
Notes: Leroy Anderson, born in 1908 and leaving us in 1975, is one of the most beloved of American composers. His music has delighted audiences for almost a century with such tunes as The Typewriter Song, The Penny Whistle Song, Bugler's Holiday, and Sleigh Ride

With Clarinet Candy, Anderson brings the clarinet section to the fore, showcasing them with parts that really do take a lot of practice. As you hear this tune, imagine if you can your own fingers trying to keep up with this tune! 

Enjoy the music now as we feaure of our entire clarinet section in Leroy Anderson's Clarinet Candy

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Liberty Bell March / Silver Clef Music Sousa / David P. Miller Narrator
Notes:

These notes are for the special SILVER CLEF arrangement, that features a REAL BELL as a solo instrument.

Tradition tells of a chime that changed the world on July 8, 1776, when the Liberty Bell pealed from Indepenence Hall in Philadephia, summoning the citizenry to hear the first public reading of the Declaration of Independence.

In 1893, John Philip Sousa had a newly written march that he wanted to call "The Devil's Deputy," but was convinced by several events to rename this march The Liberty Bell. It became a huge commercial success for Sousa.

Tonight, we have a new, special arrangement of this popular tune, and we have with us a special guest soloist Bell-Ringer. Ladies and Gentlemen, conductor ____ ______ will now introduce our guest soloist.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
España Cañi Pascual Marquiña /  Robert Longfield Narrator
Notes: Bullfighting is not a popular sport in this country, but the music associated with the flash and pageantry of the Corrida de los Toros remains exciting every time we hear it. 

Bandleader Pascual Marquiña wrote music for his band to play at bullfights in Madrid. The tune España Cañi, which means "Spanish Gypsy Dance," is in the style of a paso doble, or two-step, and is very popular among Spanish ballroom dancers.

A paso doble is traditionally used as introductory music for a bullfight, to usher in the matadors and other participants.

Ladies and gentlemen, we play for you now Robert Longfield's arrangement of the exciting bullfight music España Cañi.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
People Who Live In Glass Houses Sousa / John Bourgeois Narrator
Notes: In 1892, John Philip Sousa left his position as conductor of the U.S. Marine Band, forming the Sousa Band. He wrote the suite you are about to hear in 1909, the year before the Sousa Band's world tour.

The music in this suite was written in the character of the music from the countries or regions from which the various drinks originate. Sousa later revised the suite and used it as ballet music for his opera, The Bride-Elect in 1923. 

This suite is in four movements: The Champagnes, The Rhine Wines, The Whiskies - Scotch, Irish, Bourbon, and Rye, and The Convention of the Cordials (liqueurs).

The suite was finally edited and published in 2002 by Col. John Bourgeois, retired commander of the Marine Band. Ladies and Gentlemen, John Philip Sousa's People Who Live In Glass Houses.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

75
Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Armed Forces Salute arr. Ellison and Lowden Narrator
Notes:

These notes are personalized for a concert on or near ARMED FORCES DAY. Feel free to modify it as needed.

President Harry S. Truman spearheaded the initiative to establish a single holiday for U.S. citizens to unite in thanks to our military members for their service and sacrifice for our country. This holiday was created in 1949. And today, May 20, 2xxx, is that day, Armed Forces Day. 

In recognition and thanks for all armed forces servicemembers, both current and past, the Mississippi Community Symphonic Band would like to invite you to join us in saluting these brave men and women, people without whom we would not have the freedoms we enjoy today. 

As we play Ellison and Lowden's Armed Forces Salute, if you are a member of, a veteran of, or have a family member or friend in any of the armed services, please stand when you hear that service's song, in honor of these people. 

Ladies and Gentlemen, the Armed Forces Salute!

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

 

 
Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Orpheus In The Underworld Jacques Offenbach/ ?? Narration
Notes:

This is going to be longer than I (or probably you) would like…. But, this story is just too good not to tell.

Back in mid 19th Century France, the government was concerned that the people were going to too many Operettas and not enough Grand Operas, so they passed laws restricting the Operetta “industry.”  Amazing that, at one time, the government actually thought that they knew better what was good for the people than the people knew themselves!  Thank goodness that we have progressed beyond that!

In 1858 the government gave up and told the Operetta people to basically produce what they wanted!

So- here’s Offenbach and here’s the story he told without restrictions…… and it’s not easy….

Orpheus in the Underworld is a satire on a Greek Myth.  The myth involves Orpheus, the world’s Greatest Musician, and his beloved Wife, Eurydice, who apparently is really hot.

Pluto, the God of the Underworld, is taken with Eurydice and causes her to die.  Orpheus descends to the Underworld and tries to bring her back.

OK- in Offenbach’s version, Orpheus is a struggling violin teacher.  He and his wife, Eurydice, hate each other.  He is involved with a Shepherdess, Chloe, and Eurydice is hanging out with a Shepherd, Aristaeus who is actually Pluto, the God of the Underworld, in disguise.  Aristaeus/Pluto, being immortal, wants to con Eurydice into doing something fatal and Orpheus thinks that this is a great plan.

Enter a character not in the Greek Version- Public Opinion, who warns Orpheus that he had better put up a front of being a loving husband or his reputation will prevent his ever getting another violin student.

In spite of this, Pluto carried out the plan to kill Eurydice and take her off to Hell.  Eurydice’s response is that it’s not bad being dead if the God of Hell is in Love with you! 

Pressed by Public Opinion, Orpheus takes his problem to Jupiter.  This somehow leads to Jupiter and all the other Gods on Olympus going down to Hell to have a party that does not involve ambrosia or nectar.  Jupiter also falls for Eurydice (I said she was hot) and this complicates things. 

The Gods decide to dance.  Jupiter only knows the Minuet, which won’t do at all, so they all improvise the Galop Infernal- right!  The Can Can!

-- Notes by Herb Fischer, Texas

 

 
Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Water Music Suite G. F. Handel / ??  
Notes:

It is 1717 in London- King George I rules the Empire but Frederich Handel rules the British Music Scene…. both are from Hanover, Germany, and barely speak English.  Hey, I don’t understand 21st Century  American Politics- why should I understand 18th Century European Politics?

King George plans a big party in London.  He and a collection of the Gentry are to board their Barges at Whitehall and sail up the Thames to Chelsea

Now these Barges aren’t anything like the ones we see on the Mississippi River.  These are the Gulfstream Jets or Rolls Limos of the 18th Century- Gold Leaf, Liveried Oarsmen- you get the picture.

To keep the gentry from getting bored on the long journey- kind of like sailing all the way from Plano to Mc Kinney- King George has Handel compose music to be played on the way.  Handel responds with three Water Music Suites totaling 21 movements.

The 50 piece Orchestra is loaded onto a barge- no room for the Harpsichord- but, thankfully, room for the Kettledrums- and off they go.

Does King George dig it?  Does he ever?  He has them play the whole 21 movements three times going up to Chelsea.  The gentry have such a good time there that the entourage doesn’t leave Chelsea until 3:00 AM.  Coming back, Play it three more times!

And, along the shore, the common Englishmen watching this and saying-

“Our Tax Dollars at work!”

We have selected four of the most familiar of the 21 movements to present to you tonight…

-- Notes by Herb Fischer, Texas

 

 
Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
The Poet and Peasant Overture Franz von Suppe / ??  
Notes:

The Composer we know as Franz von Suppe’ was born in Dalmatia, where his Father was an Official of the Austro- Hungarian Empire.  His family background was Italian, Polish, and Czech.  He was Christened (I’d appreciate it if you Italian Polish Czech Dalmatian Austrians in the audience wouldn’t laugh at my pronunciation)

Francesco Ezechiele Ermenegilo Cavaliere Suppe’ Denelli

But his friends called him Franz.

In 1846- early in his career- he composed an Overture and incidental music for a play by Karl Elmar, Dichter und Bauer.  Even though this more directly translates to Poet and Farmer, in English Poet and Peasant gives it a nice alliteration.

With this play, as with most of von Suppe’s Operettas, the plot is all but forgotten, but the music of the Overture lives on.

-- Notes by Herb Fischer, Texas

 

 
Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Rhapsody In Blue George Gershwin /  
Notes:

George Gershwin tried, very successfully, to blend  jazz. folk, and classical into a uniquely American musical form.  When his jazz flavored Piano Concerto, Rhapsody in Blue, premiered in 1924 it wasn’t with a Symphony Orchestra- it was with Paul Whiteman’s Jazz Band, with strings- and even a banjo- added.

Since then many arrangements have been written for Orchestra, for Band…. If you’ve ever taken the moving sidewalk between Concourses B and C at Chicago’s O’hare Airport you might have heard one apparently written for an unspecified number of Chimpanzees playing Percussion Instruments…

But here’s our Rhapsody in Blue- with Mr Carlos Chipps playing the Clarinet solo

-- Notes by Herb Fischer, Texas

 

 
Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Carmen Giuseppe Verdi /  
Notes:

If we haven’t known women like Carmen, we have heard about them.  They exist in every country, in every age, in every social group.  Males melt in their presence. 

Now, they get used to having a male melt on command and when some poor jerk doesn’t, he becomes- well, interesting (for a while).

So here’s poor Corporal Don Jose’ and his fellow troopers outside the cigarette factory waiting for the shift change.  Their tongues are all hanging out for the cigarette babes, especially for Carmen, but Don Jose’ has just been visited by Micetela, the Girl Next Door his Mother wants him to marry.

You can already see where this is going, can’t you?

Translating one of Carmen’s Arias….. 

            Love me not, then I love you
            If I love you, you’d best beware 

            You think you hold love fast, it flies
            You think you’re free, it holds you fast

She senses that Don Jose’ isn’t properly infatuated, so she throws a rose at his feet signifying that this is his lucky night.

This being a family concert, fast forward to Act II…..

Carmen- nice gal- gets into a knife fight with another Cigarette Babe at work and slashes her face.  Officer Morales breaks it up and turns her over to Don Jose’ to be taken to the slammer, saying- sorry, but I can’t help myself- “Book Her, Danno.”

Well, Carmen sweet talks Don Jose’ into letting her go, which gets him thrown into jail for a month and busted to PFC, or the equivalent in the Spanish Army.

When he gets out he reunites with Carmen just before the bugle calls him back to duty.  Carmen accuses him of being a hopeless wuss if he goes, but Capt Zungia, who is also there, gives him some compelling reasons to obey.  The Capt and Don Jose’ get into a sword fight, which is broken up by a couple of smugglers (hey, this is Opera!) who whisk Carmen and Don Jose’ away.

So- Don Jose’ has let a prisoner escape, got busted in rank, spent a month in the brig, went AWOL, and tried to kill his C.O.  His chances of making Sergeant in the next promotion cycle are slipping away….

So he and Carmen are holed up in the hills with the Smugglers, Don Jose’s career and life are ruined, and here comes Escamillo, the Matador, who instantly becomes Carmen’s new squeeze and Don Jose’ is history.  Out come the swords again and again the pesky Smugglers stop the action before any serious damage is done.

Next Act- the Bullring- Escamillo is doing his thing and Carmen is suitably impressed.  Don Jose’ is unimpressed with Escamillo and even less impressed with Carmen and stabs her in the heart.

-- Notes by Herb Fischer, Texas

 

 
Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Big Band Cavalcade arr. Andy Clark Narrator
Notes:

From the late 1920’s through the 1950’s hundreds of jazz bands toured the country, playing for concerts, dances, and civic events. Names like Tommy Dorsey, Glenn Miller, and Harry James became household words as these bands imprinted their own unique style of entertainment into America’s music history. Andy Clark has captured the sounds and styles of these bands, in a medley of Johnson Rag, You Made Me Love You, Little Brown Jug, and Cousins. Ladies and Gentlemen, enjoy now Andy Clark’s arrangement, Big Band Cavalcade.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

 

 
Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
El Capitan John Philip Sousa, edited by David P. Miller Narrator
Notes:

In 1896, John Philip Sousa completed work on his 3-act comic opera El Capitan. Even though this opera contained some 25 musical numbers, only two of those melodies are remembered well today. In 1899, Sousa extracted two of the melodies from the opera and assembled them into what we know today as the El Capitan March.

Ladies and Genetlemen, here's the _________ Band, playing John Philip Sousa’s El Capitan March.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

 

 
Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
His Eye Is On The Sparrow Charles H. Gabriel, arr. Rebekah Hamilton Narrator
Notes: (Hamilton arrangement is for flute solo with band accomp. Notes suitable for any arr.)

This tune’s origins started in 1905, when a Dr. and Mrs. Martin visited a severely crippled couple by the name of Doolittle. The Doolittles were perpetually happy, bringing inspiration and comfort to anyone around them. When Dr. Martin asked the Doolittles what was their secret, Mrs. Doolittle replied, “His eye is on the sparrow, and I know he watches me.” This simple response became the inspiration for the words to the hymn. Mrs. Martin mailed the poem to Charles Gabriel the day after she wrote it, and he penned the music you will hear now.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

 

 
Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Seventy-Six Trombones Meredith Willson, arr. Leroy Anderson Narrator
Notes: One of the most fun tunes Meredith Willson ever wrote was the perennial favorite, Seventy Six Trombones. Strangely enough, the original tune did not feature the trombone section! Well Leroy Anderson took care of that! In this delightful arrangement, adapted by Jay Bocook, Anderson brings the trombone section to the fore, but he also throws in a few typical Leroy Anderson surprises! See how many other famous melodies you can hear as we feature our trombone section in Meredith Willson’s Seventy-Six Trombones.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

 

 
Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Silvercrest March James Swearingen Narrator
Notes: James Swearingen’s Silvercrest March was commissioned by the employees of a music store in Ohio in honor of their founder and the store’s 25th anniversary.

We are proud to present for you now James Swearingen's Silvercrest March.

(Needs more!)

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

 

 
Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
An American In Paris George Gershwin Narrator
Notes: George Gershwin is one of the most famous and well-known of American composers. He pretty much invented a new flavor of music, the playing of the jazz idiom in a symphonic setting. His work was so innovative that it confounded the critics of the day, and often got chilly reviews. But the appeal of his music was unstoppable, and Gershwin quickly became hugely popular, and remains so even today, 68 years after his death. We are pleased to play for you now Robert Lowden’s arrangement of Gershwin’s famous An American In Paris.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

 

 
Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
God Of Our Fathers arr. Claude T. Smith Narrator
Notes: The words to the now famous hymn, God Of Our Fathers were written in 1876 for a 4th of July celebration in Vermont. In 1888, the hymn – consisting of words only – was chosen as the hymn for the celebration of the centennial of the adoption of the constitution, and George Warren wrote the melody we are about to hear. This hymn has become one of the favorite standards, and now we would like to play for you Claude T. Smith’s stirring arrangement of God Of Our Fathers.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

 

 
Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Polar Express (Themes from) Ballard and Silvestri, arr. Michael Story Narrator
Notes: “Children … Sleeping … Snow is softly fall – ing …” You may recognize these words as the lyrics from the song Believe, from the Movie The Polar Express.

This movie is a delightful story of children’s belief in Santa Claus, and how only those who truly believe can hear the ringing of a reindeer’s sleigh bell.

It is a story of believing, and how faith can work miracles.

Enjoy the music now as the Mississippi Community Symphonic Band plays themes from the movie The Polar Express, and ask yourself, what is it you believe? What miracle do you seek? What reindeer bell can you hear? Ladies and Gentlemen, themes from The Polar Express.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

 

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Do You Hear What I Hear Noel Regney and Gloria Shayne, arr. Calvin Custer Narrator
Notes: Our next number is an excellent illustration of how you can take a simple tune and turn it into a symphonic work.

Arranger Calvin Custer started with the lovely hymn Do You Hear What I Hear, and set it into a symphonic fantasy that uses all the tools of the composer’s trade.

Through fast sections and slow, through quiet sections and loud, Custer continually weaves the main theme, culminating in a triumphant finish.

Ladies and gentlemen, enjoy with us now Calvin Custer’s arrangement of Do You Hear What I Hear.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

 

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
A Fireside Christmas Sammy Nestico Narrator
Notes: Sammy Nestico is famous for his marvelous harmonies and lush orchestrations. He has composed for the Count Basie orchestra, and been the leader of the Airmen Of Note USAF jazz band as well as the White House dance orchestra.

In this arrangement, Nestico brings his own unique touch to Rudolph The Red Nosed Reindeer, I’ll Be Home For Christmas, Frosty the Snowman, Winter Wonderland, and Mel Tormé’s The Christmas Song.

Ladies and Gentlemen, we close out the first half of our program tonight with Sammy Nestico’s delightful medley, A Fireside Christmas.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

 

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Carol Of The Bells/Greensleeves arr. Larry Clark Narrator
Notes: Peter Wilhousky discovered the famous Ring Christmas Bells as a Ukrainian folk song. He added Christmas lyrics and titled it Carol of the Bells, bringing it to the fame it enjoys today.

Arranger Larry Clark has combined this song with the traditional English tune Greensleeves into what he calls a “tune sandwich.”

In this “sandwich,” Clark has weaved both tunes together into a smooth fantasia, combining both carols beautifully into a single work.

Ladies and Gentlemen, Larry Clark’s setting of Carol of the Bells and Greensleeves.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

 

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Angels From The Realms Of Glory Thomas Smart, arr. Robert W. Smith Narrator
Notes: In 1816, James Montgomery first published Angels from the Realms of Glory under the title “Nativity.” It was later set to the hymn “Regent Square” by Thomas Smart, and published in 1847 as the carol we know today.

Robert W. Smith has reset this glorious tune into a dynamic symphonic masterpiece. With sections that are quiet and tender, contrasting with sections that are clamorous and triumphant, Smith’s rendering of this classic will touch your deepest emotions.

Ladies and Gentlemen, Robert W. Smith’s symphonic setting of Angels From The Realms of Glory.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

 

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
The Wonderful World of Christmas arr. James Christensen Narrator
Notes: What Christmas concert would be complete without even more of our favorite carols, tunes we all remember and love?

James Christensen has brought together a wonderful selection of Christmas tunes, including Bring A Torch, Jeannette Isabella, The First Noel, Ring, Christmas Bells, The Twelve Days of Christmas, The March of the Kings, and We Wish You a Merry Christmas.

Ladies and Gentlemen, James Christensen’s The Wonderful World of Christmas!

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

 

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
O Holy Night (for Tenor Solo with Band) Adolphe Adan, arr. David P. Miller Narrator
Notes: Tonight, ladies and gentlemen, we have a special guest soloist with us.

(Guest singer bio here) He will now sing O Holy Night.

In 1847, a French priest asked Placide Cappeau, an occasional writer of poetry, to write a Christmas Poem. On his way to Paris, Cappeau conceived and wrote the poem “Minuit Chretiens,” (man-WE cray-TEEAN) which he then took to composer Adolphe Adam (ay DOLF a-DAN), who was then at the peak of his career. Adan wrote the tune in just a few days, and the song Cantique de Noel was premiered at Christmas eve mass in 1847. Interestingly, Adam was jewish.

Since then, O Holy Night has become recognized as one of the most beautiful and moving of all Christmas carols.

We are pleased to present to you _________, singing a touching arrangement of O Holy Night.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

 

Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
Hallelujah Chorus George F. Handel, arr. Robert Longfield Narrator
Notes: George Frederic Handel wrote the oratorio The Messiah in 1741. What most people don’t know is that he wrote the entire work in an unbelievably short time – a mere twenty-one days!

The story goes that at the work’s premiere performance in April of 1742, King George II, in attendance at the concert, was so moved by the joy and jubilation reflected in the Hallelujah Chorus that he rose to his feet. Of course when the king stands, no one sits, so the entire audience also stood.

Audiences continue to honor this tradition even today by standing during the performance of this powerful and inspiring work.

If you are able, you may also wish to stand, in celebration of the season, and rejoice with us all as we close our concert with Handel’s awe inspiring Hallelujah Chorus.

-- Notes by David P. Miller, Mississippi Community Symphonic Bands

 

 
Title/Publisher (if known) Author/Arranger Suitability
(reserved for future use)    
Notes:  

 

 

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are Copyright © 2005, 2010 by David P. Miller and Silver Clef Music Publishing, Inc.